“Bread Being Distributed to the People,” Detail of “Procession of Pope Clement VII and the Emperor Charles V after the Coronation at Bologna on February 24, 1530”, Nikolaus Hogenberg, hand-colored etchings on a scroll.Courtesy of Getty Research Institute, Los Angeles.

A Year Of Art At The DIA

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"Jack White, The White Stripes, Gold Dollar, 3129 Cass Ave, Detroit, November 27, 1999," Doug Coombe, 1999, pigment print.Courtesy of the Detroit Institute of Arts.
“Jack White, The White Stripes, Gold Dollar, 3129 Cass Ave, Detroit, November 27, 1999,” Doug Coombe, 1999, pigment print.
Courtesy of the Detroit Institute of Arts.

(DETROIT, MI) – The Detroit after Dark: Photographs from the DIA Collection hosted at the Detroit Institute of Art though to April 23 features photographs of Detroit at night. Beginning with rare after-hours views by Robert Frank from 1955, most of the photographers are native Detroiters.

The exhibition also examines architectural studies, street scenes, graffiti, and otherworldly vignettes found in photos by Jon DeBoer, Scott Hocking, Ralph Jones, Rob Kangas, Dave Jordano, Russ Marshall, and Tom Stoye.

The exhibition also features images of Detroit’s legendary night haunts like the jazz club Baker’s Keyboard Lounge, the Grande Ballroom, and punk and garage rock dens such as Bookie’s Club and the Gold Dollar.

A section on musicians features photographs by Marshall, Doug Coombe, Jenny Risher, Sue Rynski, Steve Shaw and Leni Sinclair, including nighttime portraits of Detroit’s hip-hop legends Awesome Dre and Guilty Simpson, among others.

The Edible Monument: The Art of Food for Festivals runs at the DIA through April 16. About 140 prints, rare books and serving manuals from the Getty Research Institute collection and private collections illustrate the elaborate monuments and sculptures made of food that were an integral part of street festivals as well as court and civic banquets in Europe in the 16th to 19th centuries.

The exhibition has been organized by the Getty Research Institute of Los Angeles.

Highlights include two copies of the first illustrated cookbook in Europe, the Opera, by Bartolomeo Scappi, who served as private chef to Pope Pius V in the 1570s, several prints from Nicolas I de Larmessin’s Suite of Fanciful Costumes depicting culinary characters such as The Cook and The Baker fashionably attired in the tools of their trades, and styled in the manner of 18th-century French fashion plates, and Palace of Circe a monumental table centerpiece by British culinary historian Ivan Day, sculpted entirely from sugar paste, and based on a design from an 18th-century serving manual by the French culinary authority Menon.

“Bread Being Distributed to the People,” Detail of “Procession of Pope Clement VII and the Emperor Charles V after the Coronation at Bologna on February 24, 1530”, Nikolaus Hogenberg, hand-colored etchings on a scroll.Courtesy of Getty Research Institute, Los Angeles.
“Bread Being Distributed to the People,” detail of “Procession of Pope Clement VII and the Emperor Charles V after the Coronation at Bologna on February 24, 1530”, Nikolaus Hogenberg, hand-colored etchings on a scroll.
Courtesy of Getty Research Institute, Los Angeles.

The DIA and the Charles H Wright Museum of African American History are collaborating to develop exhibitions as part of a community-wide remembrance of the Detroit Rebellion of July 1967. The exhibitions, each taking a different approach, will complement one another.

Art of Rebellion: Black Art of the Civil Rights Movement will run at the DIA from July 23 until October 22. This exhibition showcases art by African American artists who formed collectives during the Civil Rights Movement of the 1960s and 1970s.

These collectives consisted of artists working together in distinct groups to make art for African American audiences that asserted black identity and racial justice. The exhibition includes 25 paintings, sculptures, installations and photographs produced by artists working in and around five important collectives from this era.

Church: A Painter’s Pilgrimage will run at the DIA from October 22 until January 14, 2018. This exhibition focuses on American artist Frederic Church’s paintings done in the Middle East, Athens, and Rome.

Church was the most popular and financially successful painter in mid-19th-century America, and best known for his large paintings of wild places in North and South America, the North Atlantic, and the Caribbean.

But, from the late 1860s until the late 1870s, many of his most important paintings represented ancient cities or buildings that he had seen on his 1867 to 1869 trip to the Middle East and the Mediterranean.

While Church’s paintings of New World subjects are primarily concerned with nature, his Old World subjects are concentrated more on human history.

This exhibition brings together almost all of Church’s most important paintings of the Middle East, Athens, and Rome in order to explore the reasons motivating this major shift in his artistic practice. It will travel to two additional venues in 2018; the Reynolda House Museum of Art in Winston-Salem, NC, from February 8 to May 13, 2018, and the Wadsworth Atheneum Museum of Art in Hartford, CT, from June 3 to August 26, 2018.

This is a ticketed exhibition.

“Gladioli,” ca. 1876, Claude Monet, oil on canvas.<br>Courtesy of Detroit Institute of Arts.
“Gladioli,” ca. 1876, Claude Monet, oil on canvas.
Courtesy of Detroit Institute of Arts.

Lastly, Monet: Framing Life will appear at the DIA from October 22, until March 4, 2018. This intimate exhibition focuses on an important painting in the DIA collection; Claude Monet’s Gladioli (c. 1876).

Monet created this work during his residency in the Paris suburb of Argenteuil between late 1871 and early 1878. Monet’s time in Argenteuil was especially productive, for it was here that he and fellow avant-garde painters formed the group now known as the Impressionists.

By bringing Gladioli together with 11 other Argenteuil paintings by Monet and fellow impressionist Pierre-Auguste Renoir, the exhibition presents a more comprehensive story about the creation of Gladioli and how it fits into Monet’s body of work, as well as the history of Impressionism more broadly.

This is a ticketed exhibition.

The DIA is open Tuesday through Thursday from 9:00am until 4:00pm, Friday 9:00am to 10:00pm, and Saturday and Sunday between 10:00am and 5:00pm.

Admission is free for DIA members and residents of Wayne, Oakland, and Macomb counties. For others the tariff is $12.50 for adults, $6 for those between the ages of 6 and 17, and $8 for seniors aged 62+.